Updates for eb.Scrubber

The device I made that leverages some new API calls we got in Live 9.2 has gotten some good updates over the past month or so. I’ve included support for the new Launchpad Pro, as well as compatibility with the very awesome Launchpad95 script.

If anyone does anything cool with this tool I’d love to see/hear it!

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Updates for eb.Scrubber

Push/Chop ver 1.0

I finally got around to cleaning this M4L device up and getting it to be stable enough to share with people. Check out a demo:

It’s a four channel Looper that can capture audio on any track in Live. It then chops the loop into 16 slices that you can trigger with the Push’s grid. There are hardware controls for playback speed, a stuttering effect, forward/reverse, one shot mode, and pattern recording. There’s also a lot of loop and quantization settings available on the device itself.

I’ve had this idea floating around since I got the Push a while ago, and it feels nice to have something usable. I used this in a performance of my piece South Hudson last weekend in Troy, NY (thanks for having me out Mr. Ryan Ross Smith!), and it proved to be stable and more importantly a lot of fun to use in a performance setting.

You can download the devices HERE. There’s more development and documentation on the way!

Push/Chop ver 1.0

Jitter and M4L proof of concept.

Since my beginnings in electronic music I have always been interested in the potential of digital sounds and images to interact. In the past this required a lot of workarounds.  Using multiple programs simultaneously and figuring out ways to send MIDI and audio data between the programs (fairly easy on the Mac OSX using the built in IAC bus, and the JACK audio routing software).  Inevitably, this became frustrating, and taxing on my CPU, although some of that can be attributed to my lack of experience in efficient programming practices. Recently I have been investigating ways of doing these types of experiments (yes, I am calling them experiments because I really don’t know what I am doing yet) all inside of Live using Jitter, the graphical, matrix processing side of M4L.

I think that Live’s modular environment is the perfect host for a collection of small, usable, and flexible visual devices that generate and modify visuals based on incoming midi and sound data from the music that I perform using Live.

The following video is small demo of me using four devices to generate visuals, albeit very primitive visuals, completely in real time inside of Live.

I am using some very simple operations and objects to visualize the audio data and do some small processing on the resulting image.

Jitter and M4L proof of concept.